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2017-11-20

NOTES

ATTENTION

Discrepencies between dwg and the "table of possibilites" below regarding external loads - to be fixed as follows :

  • each pylon = SC2500 = 2400 kg = 5285 lbs worth but...
  • 2×bombs in tandem up to SW250 (550 lbs)
  • 1×bomb per pylon for any value or size above SW250
 
     
 

HE177C1 / HE177C2 / HE177C3  Griffin

 
     
  The story which didn't happen ... outside Atlantic Air Combat  
     
  See also : Articles
 He177A Greif - Article 1
 He177A Greif - Article 2
He177B Greif
He274A Greif
Notes
 He177A Greif - Notes
Illustrations : He177B
 He177B5.Profile - See HE177C
 He177B5.Top
 He177B5.Bottom
 He177A5.Front (A,B,C)
 He177B5.Fuel Tanks
 -
 He177A5.Bomb.Bay - 1944
 -
Illustrations : He177C2/C3
 He177C2.Profile
 He177C2.Top
 He177C2.Bottom
 He177C2.Front - See HE177B
 He177C2.Fuel    - See HE177B
 He177C2.Bomb.Bay
 He177C2.Bomb.Bay - 1948
 He177C2.Bomb.Bay - 1959
 He177C2.Bomb.Bay - ASW/SAR
 He177C3.Bomb.Bay - ASS
 He177C2.Recce.Pack
 

INTRODUCTION

The Heinkel He177 Greif  was Germany only real heavy bomber during WWII, with a little over 1,000 manufactured during the war.  Among the various sequels of the design were the four engined He177B, and the four engined high altitude He274 derivative, produced by Farman in France with two airframes completed after the war and used for a while by the Armée de l'Air.

But in Atlantic Air Combat™, the French weren't alone in taking advantage of WWII Germany technology, as so did the Swedes.

Country

   

QTY

Aircraft

Name

1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967

Germany

   

413

He177A3

Greif

1943 1945                        

Germany

   

565

He177A5

Greif

1944 1945                        

Sweden

   

32

He177C1

B-27A Grit

1945 1957 > 1957                    

Sweden

   

(32)

He177C2

B-27B Grit

1958 >>     1958

Switzerland

   

(8)

He177C2

B-27B Grit

1961 >>           1961

France

   

2

He274V1

//

1945 1953                        

PREQUEL

Sources vary a little about the actual number of He177B assembled, but in the closing days of the war a full squadron of these high altitude pressurized bombers, escorted by quite a pack of navalizd Me3095 and accompanied by three Me323 transport aircrafts overloaded with Heinkel and Messerschmitt documents fled to Sweden where they were immediately interned.   Not surprisingly, the Allies demanded these factory new aircrafts to be handed over to them, but to no avail - interned aircrafts were interned aircrafts.   In the end, having had the opportunity to seize and test fly a couple of He177A5, and considering the scores of airframes found resting on various airfields and the non impressive (to Allies assessment) results of these tests, the diplomatic harrassment was suspended in favour of an exchange of good will : if Sweden would make one of these four engined bomber temporarily available for inspection/testing, Sweden would be welcome to send technicians in Germany to collect whatever they would be interrested in to support their equipment of German origin.

It was somewhat a paradox because as Sweden had contemplated aquiring either Avro Lincoln or Boeing B-17G bombers, neither UK nor the US would sell them any while in the mean time both Argentina and Brazil were able to purchase packs of them...  Brazil had been part of the Alliance, all right, but Argentina, really ?   In a way, Sweden did not really have the need for heavy bombers, with access to modern aircraft technology being the real aim.  On the other hand, since 32 fully equipped factory new airframes were handed for free...

From their visit in beaten Germany, Swedish engineers brought back a dozen of engineless He177A5 airframes and scores of DB603 engines and all sort of parts.   And with Volvo having had, after a long negociation during the war, the license to manufacture the DB605, licences for the DB603A and S were easily granted.  Not that Volvo intended to launch the production of the engine, but it gave them full access to the technology involved, including the TK11 turbo surpercharger, essential if they were to operate these aircrafts for some time which, after some debate, they decided to do.

The Swedish Air Force, well informed about the various issues that plagued the type during the war, asked Saab to inspect the airframes and ensure they could be used safely.  These He177B2R4 as they were referred to by the manufacturer illustrated an interresting attempt to solve the many problems the Luftwaffe had encountered.  But these aircrafts were propelled by four exhaust driven turbocharged DB603S, scheduled for the He274.  Much less troublesome than the 24 cylinder engines mounted on other variants, their combined power allowed some marked increase in MTOW and they were associated with twin tail arrangement to enhance lateral control.

The  defensive armament was a mix of what had worked well, and what could have been mounted on the He277 "Amerika" bomber, with two quad MG161 turrets, one under the chin (controlled by the co-pilot) and one in the tail (pressurized like the main cockpit).  The manned mid-dorsal turret had been removed leaving only the remote controlled turret on top.   Hower, that general location had been replaced by a ventral turret remotely controlled from the gondola from which the single guns had naturally disappeared.  A most impressive set up indeed.   In order for the SwAF to operate these aircrafts in a durable manner, SAAB, Volvo and Ericsson identified several areas were improvements could be made; they were carried out in two steps : in 1946-1948 after the decision to add these bombers into SwAF inventory was made, and in 1956-1959 when these aircrafts were upgraded as "strategic bomber", an non-orthodox sequel, considering the time frame, of the adoption of nuclear weapons by both Sweden and Switzerland .

1946-1948 : He177C1 GRIFFIN

DB603 Engine Upgrade

Volvo suggested to rework the TK-11 turbo supercharger somewhat, to improve the power ouput at altitude, and fuel efficiency, bringing it from 0.474 lb/hp/hr down to 0.400 lb/hp/hr, a result similarly achieved by Wright with their R3500 turbo compound radial engine.  The performances of the DB603S and of the aircraft itself made the Swedes wonder why the German spent so much time redesigning the whole thing into the He274 as the He177B2R4 would fly almost as high as this French-built variant, and definitely so would the revamped Swedish variant.

Defensive Weapons

as built, the He177B2R4 flown to Sweden were equipped as follows :
Gun position
chin quad turret
dorsal remote twin turret
dorsal manned single turret
ventral remote twin turret
tail quad manned turret
Gun type
4 × 13mm MG131 guns
2 × 13mm MG131 guns
1 × 13mm MG131 gun
2 × 13mm MG131 guns
4 × 13mm MG131 guns
Ammunition
300 rpg
1000 rpg
1000 rpg
1000 rpg
300 rpg
Crew list
1: pilot - 2: co-pilot/bombardier/gunner
3. navigator/gunner
4: gunner, in pressurized cell
5: gunner, laying in the gondola
6: gunner, in tail pressurized cell

While other variants had seen their lighter guns gradually replaced with 20mm MG151cannons, these four engine bombers had standardized on 13mm guns used in the two quad turrets - a perhaps weaker but nevertheless impressive set up.

As in Swedish service these aircrafts were mainly intended for maritime patrol and/or high altitude flights over hostile territory, and considering the advent of jet fighters made gun turrets obsolete, SAAB suggested to either keep the front and tail turrets (C1) or suppress all defensive armament (C2).  Should the guns be maintained, it was suggested to replace the MG131 by locally produced 13.2mm AKAN44.  The SwAF only concede to the removal of the dorsal and ventral armament, but retained both the tail and chin quads, with the latter blocked as fixed forward firing guns with the removal of the swivelling mechanism to make room for the 57mm barrels.  With Bofors perfectly able to supply ammunitions for the MG131, and enough spare parts being available, these were thus not replaced.

Internal Offensive Weapons

Bombs : The original bomb bay was able to carry an impressive range of bombs, all the way up to a pair of 5285 lb SC2500s.  The range of bombs used by Swedish Air Force differed somewhat from the one used by the Luftwaffe during the war, whith Sweden's heaviest bomb being the 600 kg SW600.  This called for an adaptation of the bomb bays shackles, especially as the SwAF had adopted the 14"/30" lugs spacing system.  A complex system was installed with an array of shackles attached to five five rails set on the ceiling of the bay.  If it allowed UP TO 16 stores of various sizes to be loaded without having to disassemble/reassemble shackles as needed, it still required careful update of the bomb selector by the load masters prior handing the aircrafts over to crews.

The bomb bay was more specifically adapted to carry large number (60) of 120kg SW120 bombs and British made Mk11 depth charges (40) in special clips lifted into the bays, thus dispensing with the shackles arrangement.  Attention was brought to other sizes of bombs as well, like the medium sized 250kg SW250 bombs, the number of which was increased compared to the similarly sized German SC250, or the 500kg SW500 and 600kg SW600 bombs.  But Sweden had also acquired various bombs from the US, and these could be handled as well.

Other weapons fitted in the large bomb bay : Mk30 ASW torpedoes, liferaft containers...   While neither a dedicated ASW nor SAR aircraft, the He177C was neverthelss tasked for peace time maritime patrol and could bring in his warload capacity if necessary.  The revised bomb bay would even swallow a pair of ASS surface attack torpedoes.  While the use of such a weapon was never really contemplated, several types were tested with success.

Then as a cargo filled with Luftwaffe ammunitions, mostly demolition bombs, had surrendered in Swedish waters at the end of the war, Sweden had an exceptionnal stock pile of the extravagant SC2500.  In the absence of better options, these had been stored rather than destroyed, probably with the idea to salvage the explosive content for their own use.   But as it often happens, these intentions were not transformed into action and while not a priority, these large bombs were adapted to fit the new shackles and the new bomb bay set up included their carriage.

Illustration 1 - 1944 Illustration 2 - 1948 Illustration 3 - 1959 Illustration 4 - ASW Illustration 5 - ASS

57mm Anti-Shipping Gun : The vast bomb triple bomb bay allowed the installation of the 57mm Bofors Akan M46, and the revised Griffin was adapted to carry a pair of these guns, each with a standard 40 rounds drum with these offset to port and starboard rather than right on top, as with the T-18B.  These large cannons could either be fired together or singly.   When fired together (in alternance rather than simultaneously) they offered a combined rate of fire of 360 rounds per minute.  The installation was a removable one, with the gun packs hoisted in the after bay, then slid into position.   The two barrels would then protrude through the now fixed forward quad turret.  A tight but neat installation which only occupied the front bay, leaving the central and the double after bomb bays available for other weapons.  The installation required the removal of the front bay doors which where then replaced by a wrap around shell lengthening the gondola so to speak.  Among the various Saab proposals, it was known as the "C3".

External Offensive Weapons

Wing pylons : Originally designed to carry the war time radio controlled FX1400 Fritz X glide bomb or Hs293 anti-shipping missile, the wing pylons (located between the engines on the original version) could carry whatever else the German had in their inventory, up to the massive 2,500 kg (5,507 lb) SC2500 demolition bomb,  these weapons carrying positions were adapted to Swedish standards to carry a single SW600 bomb or extra fuel.  Then, the starboard pylon was wired to carry a podded radar.

HVAR rockets : With the secondary maritime patrol role in mind, SAAB suggested to adapt the outer wing panels to support HVAR rockets in order to widen the offensive options, with rockets standing between the forward firing 13mm quad and the internal bomb load.  Four rails were installed and wired under each wing, each of them able to handle a variety of models, either indigenous (Bofors 135mm RRI) or foreign (the US 5 inch RM5" or the Brtish 76mm RP3).   The much heavier (245lb) Swiss WG27 rocket however, could only be hung under the wing pylons.

Avionics

Together with Ericsson, Saab suggested to take advantage of the (proposed) removal of the chin turret and gondola crew positions to install an enclosed chin mounted bombing/search radar.   However, this was too much of a rebuilt, and instead the SwAF opted for an off-the-shelf pod mounted radar (US made AN/APS-6)

Fuel System

All the aircrafts surrendered by the German had the "long bomb bay".  As the secondary Maritime patrol task required endurance, Saab manufactured removable fuel cells which could be installed singly or in pairs in either the forward, central or aft bomb bays. Two 175 gallons cells would fit in the forward and central bays for a total of four, and two 312 gallons cells would fit in the after bay, allowing a variety of options depending on the combination of extra fuel cells being carried.  While requiring careful handling, they weren't much more difficult to install and remove than any other bomb bay load.  Not all combinations had a practical application, and installing them by pair was not mandatory but in absence of reason to do otherwise, the practice settled in, only to discover a decade later that there was indeed one setup where an assymetric arrangement made sense.

As already outlined, the existing underwing pylons were made able to carry extra fuel.  Various models in use with the SwAF were possible, but with the AN/APS-6 radar usually carried on starboard, a 92 gal (110 US gal) drop tank was carried under the port wing in order to restore some aerodynamic balance.

Compared to the more common He177A, the adoption of a single leg main landing gear retracting backward in the inner engine nacelles had left a huge empty space the Germans didn't left unused, as more fuel were carried in an extra four tanks, duplicating the inboard wing tanks.  Another specific aspect of this particular version of the German bomber

Reconnaissance Pack - Illustration

As the high speed and altitude (by 1945 standards) reached by these machines made them ideal high altitude photo reconnaissance aircrafts, a two-parts recce pack was designed to be installed in the central bomb bay, very much like an extra fuel tank.  It calls for the replacement of the middle bomb bay doors with modified ones incorporating windows for the 5 cameras.  The installation of the recce pack in the central bomb bay still allowed the frontal and after bays to be filled with whatever appropriate load : bombs, mines, or even the 57mm gun pack.

Crew Compartment

The removal of the dorsal and ventral firing position as well as other internal equipment layout modifications lead to a significant reduction of the crew, from 6 to 4.
Gun position
chin quad turret
dorsal remote twin turret
dorsal manned single turret
ventral remote twin turret
tail quad manned turret
Gun type
4 × 13mm MG131 guns
removed
removed
removed

4 × 13mm MG131 guns
Ammunition
300 rpg
//
//
//
300 rpg
Crew list
1: pilot
2: co-pilot/bombardier/gunner
3. navigator/radar operator
4: gunner, in tail pressurized cell

1956-1958 : He177C2 GRIFFIN

The controversial decision made by the Swedish government to develop a nuclear device in co-operation with Switserland had ripped their budget, leaving no funds available to develop an aircraft specifically designed to carry it, further adding to the controversy.  It was expected that the size and weight of the weapon would shrink from around 3,000lb to probably a third of this value but the bulk of initial designs meant that only the antiquated German bomber could reasonably carry it.   As these war veterans seemed to have sustained a decade of use well and without loss, it was decided to have them undergo a major overhaul and further improve them.  The C2 designation was re-used to identify the overhauled aircrafts.

Internal Offensive Weapons

Bombs : With the RbN nuclear bomb being scheduled for "less than 3,000lb", the bomb bay didn't need much attention as it had been designed to carry weapons in the 4,000lb-5,000lb class.   It was however the opportunity to ensure bombs acquired in the mean time would fit the aircraft, like the 2,000 M66 or the 3,000lb M118 bombs.

While everyday a less likely weapon than the day before, the capacity to carry surface torpedoes internally was maintained as the USN showed during the Korean War that these could still be put to some good use; no reason to throw away an existing capacity.

Illustration 1 - 1944 Illustration 2 - 1948 Illustration 3 - 1959 Illustration 4 - ASW Illustration 5 - ASS

57mm Anti-Shipping Gun : As for the surface torpedoes, there were no reason to abandon the optional load, and the possibility to carry the internal gun pack was maintained.

External Offensive Weapons

Wing pylons - existing mid-wing : redesigned to the standards of the day, and with podded radar no longer a necessity (see below), the original pair of pylons were rebuilt to accept up to two bombs (in tandem) hung from NATO standards 14"/30" spaced lugs or a four posiiton multiple ejector rack (MER) allowing up to 4 bombs.  They still could carry extra fuel tanks, or the newly developped Rb4 anti-shipping missiles.

Additional innner wing pylons : the bomber were also donned with a second pair of pylons, between the fuselage and the inner engine nacelles.  Stressed for up to 5,300lb, they had the same capacity as the mid-wing pylons (fuel, bombs, single or paired in tandem and MER), but could not carry the Rb4 missile as it didn't allow enough space for it.  All four pylons would handle the 245lb Swiss WG27B heavy rocket (a single item per pylon).

HVAR rockets : the capacity was maintained.

FFAR rockets : like other air forces, the SwAF had adopted rocket pods for its various aircrafts.  Rather than the French 68mm, most common in Europe, Sweden had opted for the American 2.75" and acquired 36 rocket launchers for the HE177 as its weight carrying capacity allowed for this extravagance.

Avionics

A more modern radar installation was felt a necessity, and the ancient ventral turret position was used to install an off-the-shelf Ecko ASV19 radar (actually the Fairey Gannet installion).  Besides its built-in surface search capacity in support of the martime patrol role, it was tweeked for mapping/bombing purposes.

Fuel System

An area where no improvements could be made, but for the adoption of larger underwing drop tanks matching the carrying capacity.  With the pylons brought to NATO standards, the Douglas designed streamlined 400 US gallons (334 gal) tank was favoured, as an off-the-shelf item.  A strange coupling for sure but an efficient one, as far as extending range was concerned

Crew Compartment

Conscious that a strategic nuclear mission over hostile territory in an antiquated aircraft could, at the very least, be described as ... hasardous (suicidal ?), cockpit crews were donned with ejection seats.  These were of a simple design (basically the same as on the ancient J-21 fighters) but it was felt as an improvement in survivabilty, albeit a modest one.  The tail gunner hower still had to bail out in the traditional manner

Bomb and Fuel Loads

The He177 bomb bay is actually made of three parts, with the third one, located at the back, itself divided in two.  Then, in the absence of any bulkhead, oversized items may occupy more than a single "area".  Among other weapons, the anti-shipping torpedoes and the bomb clips beneficiate from this flexibility.  Considering the variety of options, the various AAC loadouts may be described as follows :
Int Extra Fuel Cellsš Drop Tanks Total Fuel Range Load Typical Warloads
gal After Bay Central Front Total Nbr˛ Total Fuel Weight naut. Max Internal External Total #
4 [3a] [3b] [2] [1] Fuel Fuel mile Load Load Load  
  Maximum Internal & External Number of Weapons                
2856 10 × [6×SW120] bomb clips - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
60× SW120
16× SW120
20064 lb 76
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
16× SW250
16× SW250
17600 lb 32
2856

6 × M117 bombs

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
M117
16× M117
16500 lb 22
2856

8 × M65 bombs

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
M65
16× M65
24000 lb 24
2856

6 × SW500 bombs

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
SW500
SW500
15400 lb 14
2856 2×SW600 2×SW600 2×SW600 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
SW600
SW600
18500 lb 14
2856 - - 2 × RbN (nuke) - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
RbN
/ /
3500 lb 2
2856

6 × M66 bombs

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
M66
M66
28000 lb 14
2566

6 × M118 bombs

- - - 2566 gal 19500 lb 4708nm 30000 lb
M118
M118
30000 lb 10
2856 - - 2 × SC25 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
SC2500
SC25
21140 lb 4
2340 - - 2 × SC25 - - - 2340 gal 17784 lb 4293nm 31716 lb
SC2500
SC25
31710 lb 6
2856 10 × [4×Mk11] depth charge clips - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
40× Mk11
16× Mk11
17920 lb 56
2856 2×Mk47 2×Mk47 2×Mk47 2×Mk47 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
Mk47
/ /
8800 lb 8
2856

8 × Mk49 depth charges

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
Mk49
/ /
5200 lb 8
2300 2×Mk90 DC 2×Mk90 DC - - - 2300 gal 17480 lb 4220nm 32020 lb
Mk90
Mk90
32000 lb 8
2856

6 × ASW torpedoes

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
Mk30
Mk30
6460 lb 10
2856

8 × Mk52 sea mines

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
Mk52
/ /
8800 lb 8
2856

6 × Mk39 sea mines

- - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
SW500
/ /
12000 lb 6
2856 - - 2 × ASS Torpedoes - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
RbTT
RbTT
11400 lb 6
2856 2×LIFE 2×LIFE 2×LIFE 2×LIFE - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
LIFE
/ /
800 lb 8
2856 - - - 2×AK46 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
AK46
/ /
3240 lb 2
2856 - - - - - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
- -
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
  2 Drop Tanks (see other loads above)                
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 - 2 668 3524 gal 26780 lb 6465nm 22700 lb
16× SW250
SW250
13200 lb 24
  4 Drop Tanks (see other loads above)                
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
16× SW250
// 8800 lb 16
  Bomb Bay Fuel Cells - (see other loads above)                
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 350 - - 3206 gal 24370 lb 5880nm 25130 lb
12× SW250
- 6600 lb 12
2856 2×312 4×SW250 4×SW250 624 - - 3480 gal 26450 lb 6385nm 23050 lb
SW250
- 4400 lb 8
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 2×175 700 - - 3556 gal 27025 lb 6525nm 22475 lb
SW250
- 4400 lb 8
2856 2×312 4×SW250 2×175 974 - - 3830 gal 29110 lb 7025nm 20390 lb
SW250
- 2200 lb 4
2856 2×312 2×175 2×175 1324 - - 4180 gal 31770 lb 7670nm 17730 lb   nos use    
  Bomb Bay Fuel Cells + 2×Drop Tanks                
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 350 2 668 3874 gal 29970 lb 7100nm 19530 lb
12× SW250
SW250
11000 lb 20
2856 2×312 4×SW250 4×SW250 624 2 668 4148 gal 32050 lb 7610nm 17450 lb
SW250
SW250
8800 lb 16
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 2×175 700 2 668 4224 gal 32625 lb 7750nm 16875 lb
SW250
SW250
8800 lb 16
2856 2×312 4×SW250 2×175 974 2 668 4498 gal 34710 lb 8250nm 14790 lb
SW250
SW250
6600 lb 12
2856 2×312 2×175 2×175 1324 2 668 4848 gal 37370 lb 8900nm 12130 lb
- -
SW250
4400 lb 8
  Bomb Bay Fuel Cells + 4×Drop Tanks                
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 350 4 1336 4542 gal 35930 lb 8333nm 13570 lb
12× SW250
fuel
6600 lb 12
2856 2×312 4×SW250 4×SW250 624 4 1336 4816 gal 37650 lb 8835nm 11850 lb
SW250
fuel
4400 lb 8
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 2×175 2×175 700 4 1336 4892 gal 38225 lb 8975nm 11275 lb
SW250
fuel
4400 lb 8
2856 2×312 4×SW250 2×175 974 4 1336 5166 gal 40310 lb 9475nm 9190 lb
SW250
fuel
2200 lb 4
2856 2×312 2×175 2×175 1324 4 1336 5516 gal 42970 lb 10120nm 6530 lb FERRY FLIGHT //  
  Typical Loadouts : Carpet Bombing                
2856 10 × [6×SW120] bomb clips - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
60× SW120
16× SW120
20064 lb 76
2856 10 × [6×SW120] bomb clips - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
60× SW120
fuel
15840 lb 60
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
16× SW250
16× SW250
17600 lb 32
2856 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 4×SW250 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
16× SW250
fuel
8800 lb 16
  Typical Loadouts : Anti-Shipping                
2856 2×RbTT torpedoes 2×AK46 - - - 2856 gal 21700 lb 5240nm 27800 lb
RbTT
AK46

HVAR
WG27
9140 lb  
2856 2×RbTT torpedoes 2×AK46 - 2 668 3874 gal 29970 lb 7100nm 19530 lb
RbTT
AK46

HVAR
WG27
8650 lb  
2856 2×RbTT torpedoes 2×AK46 - 4 1336 4542 gal 35930 lb 8333nm 13570 lb
RbTT
AK46
HVAR
fuel
8160 lb  
  Typical Loadouts : Stand Off Missile Strike                
2856 - - - 2×175 350 2 668 3874 gal 29970 lb 7100nm 19530 lb
-  -
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
2856 2×312 - - 624 2 668 4148 gal 32050 lb 7610nm 17450 lb
-  Fuel
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
2856 - - 2×175 2×175 700 2 668 4224 gal 32625 lb 7750nm 16875 lb
-  Fuel
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
2856 2×312 - 2×175 974 2 668 4498 gal 34710 lb 8250nm 14790 lb
-  Fuel
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
2856 2×312 2×175 2×175 1324 2 668 4848 gal 37370 lb 8900nm 12130 lb
max  Fuel
AgmRb4
2644 lb 2
  Typical Loadouts : Heavy Strike - M118 3000 lb bombs                
2566

6 × M118 bombs

- - - 2566 gal 19500 lb 4708nm 30000 lb
M118
M118
30000 lb 10
2856

4 × M118 bombs

2×175 350 - - 3206 gal 24370 lb 5880nm 25130 lb
M118
M118
24000 lb 8
2856

6 × M118 bombs

- 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
M118
fuel
18000 lb 6
  Typical Loadouts : Heavy Strike - Mk90 as 4000 lb bombs                
2300

2×Mk90 DC

2×Mk90 DC - - - 2300 gal 17480 lb 4220nm 32020 lb
Mk90
Mk90
32000 lb 8
2856

2×Mk90 DC

2×Mk90 DC - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk90
fuel
16000 lb 4
  Typical Loadouts : Heavy Strike - SC25 5285 lb bombs                
2344 - - 2 × SC25 - - - 2340 gal 17784 lb 4293nm 31708 lb
SC25
SC25
31710 lb 6
2856 2×312 2 × SC25 624 - - 3480 gal 26450 lb 6385nm 23050 lb
SC25
SC25
21140 lb 4
2856 2×312 2 × SC25 624 4 1336 4816 gal 37650 lb 8835nm 11850 lb
SC25
fuel
10570 lb 2
2856 2×312 1×SC25 1×175 799 4 1336 4991 gal 38978 lb 9150nm 10522 lb
SC25
fuel
5285 lb 1
  Typical Loadouts : Nuclear Strike                
2856 2×312 2×RbN 624 4 1336 4816 gal 37650 lb 8835nm 11850 lb
RbN
fuel
3500 lb 2
2856 2×312 1×RbN 1×175 799 4 1336 4991 gal 38978 lb 9150nm 10522 lb
RbN
fuel
1750 lb 1
  Typical Loadouts : Search & Rescue                
2856 12×Liferafts T15 (15 persons/@) - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
12× Life15
fuel
1200 lb 12
2856 6×Life15 2×175 2×175 700 4 1336 4892 gal 38225 lb 8975nm 11275 lb
Life15
fuel
600 lb 6
2856 24×Liferafts T10 (10 persons/@) - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
24× Life10
fuel
2400 lb 24
2856 12×Life10 2×175 2×175 700 4 1336 4892 gal 38225 lb 8975nm 11275 lb
12× Life10
fuel
1200 lb 12
  Typical Loadouts : Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)                
2856 10 × [4×Mk11] depth charge clips - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
40× Mk11
fuel
12800 lb 40
2856 10×Mk47 depth charge - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
10× Mk47
fuel
3500 lb 10
2856 2×Mk49 2×Mk49 2×Mk49 2×Mk49 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk49
fuel
5200 lb 8
2856 2×Mk90 2×Mk90 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk90
fuel
16000 lb 4
2856 8×Mk11 8×Mk11 2×Mk30 Torpedo - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
16× Mk11
Mk30
fuel
6420 lb mix
2856 6×Mk47 2×Mk30 Torpedo - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk47
Mk30
fuel
3400 lb mix
2856 2×Mk49 2×Mk49 2×Mk30 Torpedo - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk49
Mk30
fuel
3900 lb mix
2856 2×Mk90 2×Mk30 Torpedo - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk90
Mk30
fuel
9300 lb mix
  Typical Loadouts : Sea-Mines                
2856 2×Mk52 2×Mk52 2×Mk52 2×Mk52 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk52
fuel
8800 lb 8
2856 6×Mk39 - 4 1336 4192 gal 31860 lb 7690nm 17640 lb
Mk39
fuel
12000 lb 6
  Notes
  š : forward [1] and central [2] bomb bay fuel cells  have the same capacity : 175 gallons each - after bomb bay [3] fuel cells are of 312 gallons each
˛ : when filled, a 400 US (334 gal) gal drop tank weights 2800 lb
  Weapons
  SW120  bomb 264 lb   Mk11  Depth charge 320 lb   RbTT  ASS torpedo 1900 lb
  SW250  bomb 550 lb   Mk47  Depth charge 340 lb   RR1  HVAR rocket 140 lb
  M117  bomb 750 lb   Mk49  Depth charge 650 lb   WG27  Heavy rocket 245 lb
  SW500  bomb 1100 lb   Mk90  Depth charge 4000 lb   G3AK44  Gun pod 13.2mm 481 lb
  SW600  bomb 1322 lb   Mk30  ASW torpedo 650 lb   AK46  Gun pack 57mm 1620 lb
  RbN  bomb 1750 lb   Mk52  Mine 1100 lb   AGMRB4  Anti-ship missile 1322 lb
  M66  bomb 2000 lb   Mk39  Mine 2000 lb          
  M118  bomb 3000 lb   LR-10  Lliferaft 10 person 100 lb          
  SC25  bomb 5285 lb   LR-15  Lliferaft 15 person 150 lb          
                             

Aircraft Designation in the Swedish Air Force

Sweden having an aircraft designation of its own, these WW2 relics were no exception, although an ancient designation was used to cover these unexpected airframes :
The He 177 B2R4  was officially known as the B-27A Grit  but was often referred to as the HE177C1 Griffin (in English !)
When modified in the late 1950, they were redesignated B-27B Grit  and unofficially as the ... He177C2.

Swiss Air Force

The development of the Swedish nuclear arsenal was carried in co-operation with Switzerland.  Pending the availability of bomb small enough to be carried by a jet fighter, the SwAF loaned eight He177C2 airframes to the Swiss Air Force as from 1961.

 
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