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. 2018-03-16

     
BACKGROUND  NOTES
WWII  General  Purpose  Bombs  -  Germany
     

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Aircraft Weapons

 AAC Bombs

Aircraft Weapons Background Notes

 General purpose bombs

 WWII & Cold War bombs

 WWII & Cold War bombs

 WWII & Cold War bombs

 Mk118.3000lb

 WWII & Cold War bombs

Cntd.

 WWII & Cold War bombs

 WWII & Cold War bombs

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 Explosive Content

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INDEX OF THIS PAGE
 Bombs - General Purpose

  WWII Bombs 

German WWII Bombs

As the time frame of Atlantic Air Combat is placed in 1963-1967, German WWII vintage bombs have little purpose, but for the fact that a few vintage WWII aircrafts manufactured in Germany before or during the war saw an extended lease of life way beyond the 1940s.  Also, a couple of aircraft types have a fictional presence in the game.  Theoretically, these are associated with US, UK, USSR or Swedish bombs rather then German ones.  There could be exceptions, the 5286 lb SC2500 being one for sure, and that's what these background notes are made for : provide data if any other one would be hand picked.

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 German WWII Bombs - Background Data

Index
German WW2 Ordnance - Source : http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/bombs.html
  SC50 SD70 SC250 SC500 SC1000 SC1200 PC1400 PC1600 SD1700 SC1800 SC2000 SC2500
Length oa 46.1" 43.2" 61.5" 80.0" 99.9"-109.5" 109.5" 110.8" 110.8" 129.6" 138"/148"/159" 136.5" 154.25"
Length body 30.0" 28.0" 47.0" 55.7"-58.5" 68.5"-75.0" 75.0" 75.7" 65.7" 92.0" 107.00" 106.0" 94.75"
Body 8.0" 8.0" 14.5" 18.0" 25.5"-26.0" 25.6" 22.0" 21.0" 26.0" 27.00" 26.0" 32.0"
Tail length 16.1" 16.0" 25.0" 29.5" 46.5" 46.5" 43.3" ? 46.5" 44.7"/55.2" 44.75" 66.50"
Tail width 11.0" 11.0" 20.0" 25.0" 24.0" 26.0" 22.0" ? 24.0" 26.0"/36.0" 24.5" 33.0"
Weight: kg 55kg 70kg 250kg 500kg 1000kg 1117kg 1400kg 1600kg 1700kg 1800kg 1950kg 2400kg
Weight: lb 122.lb 155.lb 550.lb 1100.lb 2200.lb 2460.lb 3085.lb 3525.lb 3744.lb 3965.lb 4295.lb 5286.lb
Explosive 55.lb 46.lb 285.lb 600.lb 1320.lb 1402.lb 661.lb 507.lb 1610.lb 2185.lb 2148.lb  
Ratio 46% 39.00% 52.00% 54.00% 60% 57.00% 21.40% 14.40% 43% 55% 50%  
Model Weight Diameter   Length Explosive AAC            
SC10 22.lb 3.4"   21.6" 9.lb              
SC50 122.lb 8.0"   46.1" 55.lb 55.lb            
SD70 155.lb 8.0"   43.2" 46.lb 85.lb            
SC250 550.lb 14.5"   61.5" 285.lb 300.lb            
SC500 1100.lb 18.5"   55.7" 600.lb 600.lb            
SC1000 2200.lb 25.7"   109.5" 1320.lb 1320.lb            
SC1200 2460.lb 25.6"   109.5" 1402.lb 1400.lb            
PC1400 3085.lb 22.0"   110.8" 661.lb 1700.lb            
SC1600 3525.lb 26.0"   110.8" 507.lb 1940.lb            
SD1700 3745.lb 26.0"   129.6" 1610.lb 2060.lb            
SC1800 3970.lb 26.0"   110.8" 2185.lb 2185.lb            
SC2000 4295.lb 26.0"   136.5" 2150.lb 2365.lb            
SC2500 5285.lb 32.0"   154.3" 2640.lb 2900.lb            
 
Bombs Weight Body Length Warhead Hs293   Hs294   Hs295  
SC0050 110.lb 7.8" 3.6ft 55.lb Type anti-ship missile Type anti-ship missile Type anti-ship missile
SC0250 550.lb 14.5" 5.3ft 300.lb Weight 1000kg Weight 2.2 tons Weight 2100kg
SC0500 1100.lb 18.5" 6.6ft 600.lb Length 3.14 Length 6.1 m (20.08 ft) Length 5.44m
SC1000 2200.lb 25.7" 9.2ft 1170.lb Span 3.58 Span 4 m (13.2 ft) Span  
SC1200 2460lb 75.0" 109.5" 1390lb Body 480mm Body 620mm Body 0.553
PC1400         Rocket 1300 lbf/10sec Rocket 2x590kgf Engine 2x1700 kgf
PC1600         Warhead 295kg Warhead 456kg Warhead 580kg
SC1800 3970.lb 26.0" 11.5ft 3300.lb Speed max 960km/h Speed max 860 km/h Speed max 860km/h
SC2000 4295lb 26.0" 136.5" 2148lb Range2 16km Range   Range  
SC2500 5286lb 32.0" 154.25" ?? Note Mod SC500 Note   Note  
 
Hs293  Missile Source1 Source2 Hs294 Missile Source1 Source2 Hs295 Missile Source1 SourceZ
Type anti-ship missile   Type anti-ship missile   Type anti-ship missile  
Weight 1000kg 1000kg Weight 2.2 tons   Weight 2100kg  
Length 3.14 3.82m Length 6.1 m (20.08 ft)   Length 5.44m  
Span 3.58 3.10m Span 4 m (13.2 ft)   Span    
Body 480mm   Body 620mm   Body 0.553  
Rocket engine 600 lbf / 10sec 1300 lbf/10sec Rocket engine 2x590kgf   Engine 2x1700 kgf  
Warhead 295kg 295kg Warhead 456kg   Warhead 580kg  
Speed max A+200km/h 960km/h Speed max 860 km/h   Speed max 860km/h  
Range1 altitude/range 12km 2200m/4km Range 14km   Range 14km  
Range2 altitude/range 16km 4000m/5.5km -     -    
Range3 altitude/range 1400m/12KM   Range 14km   Range 14km  
Range4 altitude/range 6000m/16KM 5000m/8.5km -     -    
Note Modified SC500 bomb Note     Note    

HH mjsfmdj fjsmlfjsmfjsmlkjf mljmjmlj HHHH HHHHH HHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHHH HHHHH HHHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHHH HHHHH HHHHH HHH mmshfmshf  sfhsmhfmsqhf m  msqfshfsmfhs mhmsqfmsfhsf mhfsfsifsfhsmfhsmfh mshfshfmshfs mhfsqfhsfhsf HHHHHHH HHHHH HHHH HHHHH HHHH HHHH

GERMAN UNDERWATERS ORDNANCE MINES Chapter 5 AIRCRAFT MINES SVK THE LM MINES
Source : http://michaelhiske.de
 

1 - The LMA Mine - Source

The LMA Mine. The LMA mine was developed between 1928 and 1934, and was the first German aircraft-laid mine. Because of its relatively small (for ground mines) weight of charge, it was not used as extensively during the war as its larger counterpart the LMB. Manufacture was discontinued early in the war, and existing stocks were used up.

The LMA mine existed in three models, representing progressive development. Origin-ally the mine was known as LMA, but, as the German nomenclature became more syste-matized, the earlier two models were considered LMA I and LMA II, and the most recent development was designed LMA III. These models were nearly identical, the differences lying primarily in methods of manufacture, small improvements designed to strengthen the mine case, and modification of the parachute assembly.

The LMA mine could be modified easily to be suitable for surface-aircraft laying, in which case the modified assembly was designated LMA/S

Description  
Shape Cylindrical, hemispheric nose, tapered tail
Material Aluminum (KSS)
Diameter 00'26.00"
Length Over-all 06'09.50"
Length Case 05'04.50"
Length Parachute 02'07.50"
Housing-Tail door 00'13.00"
Housing-Parachute 00'13.50"
Charge 660 lb. cast hexanite
External Fittings  
Suspension lug center line, 24 in. abaft the nose
Parachute lug Inside parachute housing, center of door
Booster release mechanism 4", 270 from top center line
13" in abaft the nose
Detonator cover
plate
4", 90 from top center line, 15" abaft the nose, secured by keep ring.
Filling-hole
covers

Three, 6":

- one in center of nose

- two, 135 and 225 respectively from
  top center line, 19" abaft the nose,
  each secured by four screws

Inspection hole
covers
Two, 7" by 9" on top center line and 180 from top center line respectively, 12" from after end; each secured by four screws
Parachute release
latch
" on top center line, 22" from after end
Ejecting plungers Six " equally spaced on after end

2 - The LMB Mine - Source

The LMB mine was developed during the same period as LMA (1928 - 1934), and was ready for use with the E-BIK by the end of 1938. It was modified in 1940 to suit the mounting of the M 3 unit. The LMB was nearly identical to LMA but carried a larger charge, and the mine case was accordingly longer. Otherwise, except for very small differences, LMA and LMB were identical in method of laying, operational use, and the firing units which could be fitted. LMB was used extensively, perhaps more than any other German influence mine

The LMB mine existed in four models, representing progressive development. Originally the mine was known as LMB, but, as in the case of LMA, the earlier two models were considered LMB I and LMB II when the nomenclature was systematized, and later deve-lopments were designated LMB III and LMB IV. LMB I, LMB II, and LMB II were nearly identical, the differences, as in LMA, lying primarily in methods of manufacture, small im-provements designed to strengthen the mine case, and modification of the parachute assembly. LMB IV was a further modification of LMB III in which the cylindrical part of the mine case, excluding the unit compartment, was made of plasticized pressed paper (press-stoff). The hemispherical nose of the mine was made of a type of bakelite. This development was brought about partially because of requirement of a non-metallic mine case for use with the experimental "Wellensonde" unit, and partially because of a short-age of aluminum. Some LMB IV cases were captured in which the whole cylindrical sec-tion of the mine case was made of pressed paper. It does not appear, however, that these were used operationally, and there is some indication that they were not water-tight at the joints.

Any models of the LMB mine could be modified easily for surface-craft laying, in which case the modified assembly was designated LMB/S.

In some cases this mine had been fitted with an additional clockwork bomb fuze to reduce the possibility of a mine's being found unexploded on land. The additional bomb fuze mounted in place of the booster release mechanism, and the booster was perman-ently housed over the detonator. The bomb fuze was mounted in an adapter tube which was screwed into the pocket in place of the booster release mechanism and spring. The remaining space was filled with booster pellets and wooden blocks.

Operation

When the mine was dropped, two lanyards were pulled, performing the follow-ing arming functions:

One lanyard released the parachute-cap latch, and the cap then served as a pilot chute. When the main chute was fully streamed, the cap fell away.

The second lanyrad, a split type, removed the bomb fuze safety pin and the booster release-mechanism safety fork. Removal of the safety pin allowed the bomb-fute to arm after a short safety interval controlled by clock-work. Removal of the safety fork allowed the booster to house over the detonator.

Upon impact with any surface, the bomb-fuze clockwork started again and, after a 17-second delay, the bomb-fuze fired the mine unless it had reached a depth of 15 feet or more. Upon reaching this depth, the bomb-fuze was again rendered passive and would or would not become active again if the mine was raised, depending on the fuze fitted

Dissolution of a soluble plug (may not be fitted) allowed water pressure to depress the clock spinde at a depth of 15 feet, starting the clock. The clock ran off its delay setting, and the firing unit began its arming cycle. Dissolution of a soluble plug released the para-chute.

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Figure 55 LMB Mine and Launching Gear on Aircraft

Figure 52 LMB III Mine Cross Section

Figure 53 LMB/S Mine

Figure 54 LMB/S Mine Plastic, with D 1 Unit

In some cases, the mine had been rigged as a shallow-water depth bomb by replacing the hydrostatic clock with a hydrostatic switch which operated at a depth of 50 feet and by plugging the bomb-fuze so that it could not be rendered passive by hydrostatic pres-sure. No self-disarming devices were fitted. One type of experimental tail door utilizing four pressure units in combination with the M1 unit was designated 4 DM.

Description
Shape Cylindrical, with hemispherical nose and tapered tail
Material Aluminum (KSS) or press-stoff
Diameter 00'26.00"
Length - Over-all 09'09.50"
Length - Case 05'08.50"
Length - Tail door 00'19.00"
Parachute housing 02'11.50"
Parachute cap 00'13.50"
Filling 1500 lb. cast hexanite
Total weight in air 2175 lbs.
External Fittings
Parachute lug Inside parachute housing
Booster release mechanism 4" , 270 from top center line 3'08" abaft the nose, secured by keep ring
External Fittings (continued)
Hydrostatic clock 6" , 180 from top center line, 4 ft. abaft the nose, secured by keep ring
Detonator cover plate 4" , 90 from top center line, 3'08" abaft the nose, secured by four screws
Bomb fuze 3" 270 from top center line, 4'01" abaft the nose, secured by keep ring
Filling-hole covers Four, 6" ; one in center of nose; one 180 from top center line, 2'11" abaft the nose; two 135 and 225 respectively from top center line, 4'01" abaft the nose each secured by four screws
Inspection hole covers Two, 7"9"; one on top center line, 21" from other end; one 180 from top center line, 21" from other end; each secured by four lock-screws
Parachute release " , on top center line, 2'02" from after end
Ejecting plungers Six, " , equally spaced on after end

3 - The LMC MineThis was an experimental development started in 1933. It was a moo-red mine designated to be laid from "vertical-shaft" aircraft (He 59) which were, how-ever, discontinued. Accordingly, the development of the LMC mine was discontinued, and the information gained was directed to the development of the LMF. It was intended to have the same general shape as the LMB mine, with a total weight of approximatey 2200 pounds, and a charge weight of approximately 660 pounds. Information on the firing de-vice used is conflicting. According to one report, influence units were used; according to another, chemical horns were used.

4 - The LMD MineThis was the first attempt to develop an aircraft-laid, moored, influ-ence mine. The mine was developed for laying by multi-purpose aircraft. LMD had a total weight of approximately 1430 pounds and a charge weight of approximately 550 pounds. Development of LMD was stopped in 1937, and the information directed to development of LMF

7 - The LMF Mine. The LMF mine development was started with the aid of the experence gained in work on the LMC and LMD developments. LMF was the first and only German operational aircraft-laid, moored, influence mine. Although it was laid operationally from aircraft, most were laid by surface craft. The LMF mine could be modified easily to be suitable for surface-craft laying, in which case the modified assembly was designated LMF/S.

Operation
When the mine is dropped, a safety fork is removed from the booster re-lease mechanism, allowing the booster to house over the detonator. As the mine separa-tes from its anchor, a pin is withdrawn from the hydrostatic clock. The mine then takes depth by a loose-bight hydrostat system. Water pressure depresses the clock spindle at a depth of 15 feet. starting the clock. The clock runs off its delay period, and the firing unit begins its testing cycle.  No self-disarming devices are fitted.

Description
Shape Cylindrical, with hemispherical nose and tapered finned tail
Material Aluminum (KSS)
Diameter 00'26.00"
Length - Over-all 07'08.00"
Length - Fwd section 03'06.00"
Length - Aft section 04'02.00"
After buoyancy 02'07.00"
Filling   610 lb. cast hexanite
External Fittings
Hydrostatic clock

6" on nose, 11 in. from center, secured by keep ring

Detonator cover
plate

4" , 270 from top center line, 2'05" from after end, screwed to case

External Fittings (continued)
Booster release mechanism

4" , 90 from top center line, 2'04". from after end, secured by keep ring

Anchor-securing
lugs
Three, 120 apart 8" from center of nose
Mooring eye

On nose, 8" from center

Suspension lug 180 from top center line, 10" abaft the nose
Joining flange

3'06" abaft the nose, fitted with 36 evenly spaced stud holes; covered by two sections of semicircular sheathing, 2"wide

Anchor-positioning
lugs

Three, 105, 195, and 345 respectively from top center of nose

Fins

Four; 45, 135, 225 and 315 from top center line, at after end; 2'05" long, 10" wide

Figure 64 LMF/S Mine

Figure 66 Diagram of LMF Mine